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Last updated on: 11/5/2008 10:52:00 AM PST
What Is Non-Voluntary Euthanasia?


General Reference (not clearly pro or con)
The BBC website's Religion and Ethics section on euthanasia explained (accessed on Aug. 20, 2007) :

"Non-Voluntary Euthanasia: The person cannot make a decision or cannot make their wishes known. This includes cases where:

  • the person is in a coma
  • the person is too young (e.g. a very young baby)
  • the person is senile
  • the person is mentally retarded to a very severe extent
  • the person is severely brain damaged
  • the person is mentally disturbed in such a way that they should be protected from themselves."

  • Aug. 20, 2007 - BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation) 

    M. Cathleen Kaveny, JD, PhD, John P. Murphy Foundation Professor of Law, in her 1997 Theological Studies article, "Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Law," explained:

    "The term 'euthanasia' in general refers to a situation in which one party adopts a course of action with the intention of causing the death of a second party in order to alleviate suffering...'nonvoluntary' euthanasia is performed on patients who have expressed and can express no view on the matter."

    1997 - Cathleen Kaveny, JD, PhD 

    Jonathan Moreno, PhD, in the introduction to the 1995 book Arguing Euthanasia, explained:

    "Passive euthanasia in the absence of knowledge of the patient's wishes (nonvoluntary) remains controversial... Within the meaning of active euthanasia, the difference between voluntary euthanasia and nonvoluntary euthanasia is also important... active nonvoluntary euthanasia may be performed on a patient who is not competent and who has not requested it."

    1995 - Jonathan Moreno, PhD